Loki Renard-Pure Evil

Loki is once more taking us into the House of Vitali. The only family where the pre-requisite to join is the fact that you REALLY don’t want to join and where attempting to kill other members of the family is to be expected. The House of Vitali is so dysfunctional that it makes Norman Bates suggest that you might want to check yourself and Joan Crawford all of a sudden says that wire hangers aren’t all that bad.

In Pure Evil, Angelo is separated from his beloved boys. He has to go deal with stupid little legal challenges from the LEOs and he has to stay in the city so that he can keep going to court. Meanwhile, Mark and Bobby have to stay in a safe, hidden location. Mark because he is a disgraced FBI agent and Bobby because, well, he’s Bobby. Angelo left Mark in charge because if he left Bobby in charge, there probably wouldn’t be anything left to come back to. Bobby is smart, but he’s also impulsive and vicious. He really needs to not be unsupervised, ever. None of this would be an insurmountable problem except for the fact that one day, Angelo doesn’t contact Mark to let him know he’s done with court and he didn’t take his car home. Someone has grabbed Angelo.

Damien is a mercenary. He’s been hired to kill Angelo, but it’s obvious that he has a personal axe to grind. He keeps telling Angelo that he’s going to do terrible things to him, but Angelo, being Angelo, isn’t fazed at all.

OK, that’s all the synopsis I’m going to give you because A) it’s pretty short and 2) I don’t want to take any of the journey away from you. Angelo is so devious that he makes Machiavelli look like a piker. He makes Twizzlers jealous. Have you ever seen a double threaded screw? Yeah, that’s not as twisty and devious as Angelo is. He has plans, more plans, backup plans, backup backup plans, and then some really good ideas as to where he’s going to go next. This book has twists, turns, swerves, and corkscrews. Each of those twists has all its own twists and turns. I mean, seriously, it’s like those stairs by MC Escher. I was left with more questions than I started with. I have no clue who knew what and when, other than the fact that I’m pretty sure Angelo knew everything all the time, I mean, he’s Angelo. This book is dark. Each of the Vitali books have gotten darker and darker. This isn’t the darkest thing I’ve ever read, but it was dark enough that I looked at the husband and was like shit, damn, fuck. Just damn. I am going to reread it this weekend to see if I can answer some of my questions.

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Seriously, my biggest question is how much did Mark know and when did he know it? That’s all I really want to know. And of course, Loki isn’t going to tell us, which means I’m just going to have to guess.

I did like seeing a softer side of Bobby. It was really interesting to see.

That’s all I have to say on this one. Go read all of them. Seriously. Happy reading!